American Trenton Racing Pigeons

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Ed Oshaben in the early 40's
Photo submitted by:Jim Schaberl

Oshaben Trenton's

Ed Oshaben passed away November 10, 2002. He wrote the following story the night before he had his stroke.
The story of Ed Oshaben's True Trentons
I started with my first Trenton in 1933 at the age of 10. I bought my first Trenton at the Chicken Market for 35 cents. All I knew was that it was a Homer. His band number was 456 M-33 AU. He was a Blue Check broad breast with a lot of bronze on his chest and heavy ceres. I didn't find out much more until I was 14. I met a pigeon flyer by the name of Stan Persin, he looked up the bird and we found out it belonged to a Westside(Cleveland) fancier by the name of John Brigiel. My older brother drove to John Brigiel's house. He was very happy to know that I had #456. He told us that someone stole the birds from him. He not only gave me permission to keep him but gave me a mate for him and another pair of Trentons. His Trentons were of the Beach strain. In 1938 I joined the White City Homing Club in Cleveland and started to fly. After awhile I purchased some Beach Trentons from a fancier by the name of Patrick McDonahue from Youngstown, Ohio. They were the old time Beach Trentons with heavy ceres and wattles. After I purchased two hens from Art Nemechek and two Red hens and a Black cock from Otting and also got three birds from Schumaker which went back to Connie Mahr. So I have a combination of all the best Trentons available. All my birds had to fly the 500 each year. I flew birds in Cleveland for 35 years. I brought twelve pairs of Trentons with me, all were 500 milers. Flying here in Lisbon, I made a practice of flying all my birds in the 500 each year and some went to the 600. Right now I have a loft of 30 pair of Trentons, one nicer than the other. They come in Blue Checks, Blue Check Smokes, Slates, Bronzes, Solid Reds, and Red Mottles, Red Smokes and Slates, Dunns, Yellows, Blacks, and some colors there are no names for.
Ed never lost his love to maintain a pure strain of the True Trenton. He carried strong convictions for the standard of a True Typical Trenton. Although he ruffled feathers at times, his point was always proven by the quality of his birds and by the number of trophies he received at ATB Conventions.
Pigeon fanciers in as far away countries as Belgium, Japan, England, Germany as well as Canada and most of the fifty states have purchased birds from Ed's loft. Many of his evenings were spent conversing by phone with new and old pigeon flyers alike, sharing his love and knowledge of Trentons.
This tribute is in loving memory to a great man. Although Dad has passed on, he will never be forgotten. All the men and women who knew him and bought Trentons from him will continue his legacy with their love for the True Trenton.


History of the Oshaben Trentons written by Ed Oshaben
submitted by Chuck & Ginny Oshaben
Email:keystrees@earthlink.net

left to right.......  Jim Schaberl.........     Ed Oshaben...............        Ernie Schaberl

Picture of my dad and I out at Oshaben's farm in Lisbon, Ohio in the mid 70's.

Photo submitted by:Jim Schaberl

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